Cystic Fibrosis Care

Over £5,541 was raised for Cystic Fibrosis Care at an exclusive event featuring TV presenter and journalist Matt Allwright. Cystic Fibrosis Care was the charity chosen by The Society of…

Matt Allwright

Over £5,541 was raised for Cystic Fibrosis Care at an exclusive event featuring TV presenter and journalist Matt Allwright.

Cystic Fibrosis Care was the charity chosen by The Society of Food, Hygiene and Technology (SOFHT) annual awards, which were hosted on 14 November at The Brewery in London.

It’s the third  year running that SOFHT has chosen to support the charity and have confirmed their 2020 event will again be helping Cystic Fibrosis Care.

Matt Allwright was the guest speaker at the awards lunch giving a talk on his BBC career and his experience of bringing rogues to book. Tenors Unlimited, the Rat Pack of Opera, who have performed at the FA Cup Final and shared a stage with Sting, Lionel Richie and Katherine Jenkins, provided entertainment at the awards. Singer Jem Sharples’ goddaughter has Cystic Fibrosis.

Patricia Kilpatrick, founder and director of Cystic Fibrosis Care, whose own daughter has the disease, said: “We are very grateful to be chosen as charity partner once again at this prestigious annual event. Every penny raised goes towards helping individuals and their families suffering from Cystic Fibrosis for which there is no cure, and we delighted to hear that we will benefit from this fantastic event in 2020.”

Cystic Fibrosis Care, which is headquartered at Snape near Bedale, was established in June 2015 by parents whose children live with the debilitating genetic condition.

The charity provides essential services, care and support directly to families. It offers individual support through grants to patients requested by Cystic Fibrosis teams and clinicians nationwide, as well as helping fund specialist medical equipment and nurse training.

Cystic Fibrosis is one of the most common life shortening chronic fatal genetic diseases affecting around 10,400 children and young adults in the UK. It affects the lungs and digestive system, making it difficult to breathe and digest food. Complications increase with age requiring ever increasing levels of care, treatment and support. The average life expectancy is in the late 30’s. There is no cure.

Cause UK is proud to provide PR services to Cystic Fibrosis Care.

If you would like expert comment on Cystic Fibrosis by Patricia Kilpatrick, Director of Cystic Fibrosis Care (pictured above) please contact clair@causeuk.com